To order Seprafilm or for more information, call 1-800-261-1570 Instructions for Use (IFU)
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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Seprafilm should not be wrapped around an intestinal anastomosis as such usage may result in increased anastomotic leak-related events, such as abscess or peritonitis. The safety and effectiveness of Seprafilm [...]  View Full Important Safety Information

For US Healthcare Professionals Only

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Can Seprafilm be used in a case in which a bowel anastomosis has been created?

Yes, Seprafilm can be used in a case in which a bowel anastomosis has been created but should not be wrapped directly around a fresh bowel anastomotic suture or staple line, as this has been shown to result in an increase in leak-related adverse events. Seprafilm can be placed elsewhere in the abdomen (e.g., under the midline incision and over non-resected traumatized bowel) to protect those sites from adhesions, as this has not been shown to increase leak-related adverse events.1


What is Seprafilm made of?

Seprafilm is comprised of two anionic polysaccharides: modified hyaluronic acid (HA) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC).  These polymers are chemically modified to have reduced water solubility and longer in vivo residence time (up to seven days—the typical tissue healing period) than the unmodified polymers, thereby enhancing its ability to reduce adhesion formation.2

  • Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a naturally occurring anionic polysaccharide found in various tissues, including connective tissue, skin, cartilage, and vitreous and synovial fluid; additionally, HA is a major component of the extracellular matrix
  • Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) is an anionic polysaccharide derivative of cellulose

How does Seprafilm work?

Seprafilm is a mechanical barrier that separates opposing traumatized tissue surfaces while they heal, reducing the formation of adhesions. Seprafilm turns into a gel within 24-48 hours after placement in the body, is resorbed from the abdominopelvic cavity within seven days—the normal tissue healing period during which new adhesions can form, and is excreted from the body via the kidneys within 28 days. Seprafilm is hydrophilic, so it sticks where you place it and does not need to be sutured into place.2


How long does Seprafilm stay in the abdomen/pelvis?

Seprafilm turns into a gel within 24-48 hours after placement in the body, is resorbed from the abdominopelvic cavity within seven days—the normal tissue healing period during which new adhesions can form, and is excreted from the body within 28 days.1


Does Seprafilm application require sutures?

No, Seprafilm is hydrophilic so it sticks where you place it and it does not require sutures for application.1


Can Seprafilm be safely used in the presence of blood?

Seprafilm is not contraindicated for use in the presence of blood. Seprafilm's approval studies establishing safety and efficacy involved abdominopelvic surgical procedures that involved overt bleeding, such as myomectomy and colectomy. Prior to Seprafilm application, the surgical field, especially desired site of application, should be as dry as possible. Thoroughly aspirate excess fluid.1

References

  1. Seprafilm® Adhesion Barrier Instructions for Use (IFU); Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA; 2008.
  2. Becker JM, Dayton MT, Fazio VW, et al. Prevention of postoperative abdominal adhesions by a sodium hyaluronate-based bioresorbable membrane: a prospective, randomized, double-blind multicenter study. J Am Coll Surg. 1996;183(4):297-306.
  3. Diamond MP. Seprafilm Adhesion Study Group. Reduction of adhesions after uterine myomectomy by Seprafilm membrane (HAL-F): a blinded, prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical study. Fertil Steril. 1996;66(6):904-910.